Skip to content

Episode 19: The Art of Creating Memories of our Pets

Show Notes

Your host, Angela Schneider, brings together another roundtable of our member photographers.

While the podcast is designed to connect you with resources to support you as your pet ages and you face those last walks together, our website supports a directory to help you find a professional pet photographer in your area.

We had our first roundtable for Episode 7: The Art of End of Life Pet Photography, when several of us gathered to chat about why memorial sessions are such an important part of our businesses.

Today, we’re discussing how we create memories for you, our listeners, our clients, the memories of our own pets that are so important to us, and how you can have beautiful artwork made with just your cellphone shots.

What to listen for

4:03 How we have created memorials for our own pets

14:53 Why it’s important for pet lovers to have professional artwork

28:30 The love – not the devil – is in the details

40:03 What you can do if you haven’t had a professional photo shoot

The photographers who joined us

Jessica Wasik of Bark & Gold Photography

Sharon Canovas of Sharon Canovas Photography

Kylee Doyle of Kylee Doyle Photography

Kirsten Hough of Wort & Flea Photography

Nancy Kieffer of Nancy Kieffer Photography

Lynn Sehnert of Lance & Lili Photography

Nicole Hrustyk of Pawtraits by Nicole

Angela Schneider of Big White Dog Photography

Darlene Woodward of Pant the Town Photography

Transcript

Angela Schneider 

Hello, everyone, and welcome to our roundtable on creating memories for our pets. Today we I am Angela Schneider from Big White Dog Photography and the founder of One Last Network. And today we have with us our member of pet photographers at One Last Network. And they are Sharon Canovas of Hamilton, Ontario; Jessica Wasik of Bark and Gold Photography in Pittsburgh; Darlene Woodward of Pant the Town Photography in Georgetown, Massachusetts; Kylee Doyle of Kylee Doyle Photography in Sacramento, California; Lynn Sehnert of Lance and Lily Photography in Ashburn, Virginia; Kirsten Hough of Flea & Worth Photography New Zealand; Nicole Hrustyk of Portraits by Nicole in Las Vegas; and Nancy Kieffer of Nancy Kieffer Photography in Syracuse, New York.

Welcome everyone. Now we know that you know, losing our pets is not always a fun, happy topic. But one of the things that I believe and part of all of the grief training that we participate in is creating memories, so that we can have comfort and healing in those memories in the days after our beloved companion animals leave our physical world. For me personally, before I even started on this journey of learning about grief and pet loss grief in particular, I knew that I wanted to make every August 20 special because Shep had meant so much to me and changed my life in so many wonderful, positive ways that I needed to carry on those wonderful positive ways. So Bella and I go on road trips and hikes and adventures every August 20. Since 2015, which would have been the first anniversary so I’d like to get started by throwing it out there to have anyone who has lost a pet, let us know … just jump in and let us know if there’s anything you do special like that to memorialize your beloved pets who have gone.

Kirsten 

I’ll jump in. I’ve actually lost eight in the last three years. Seven dogs and one cat, all seniors aged between 14 to nearly 17. So one of the things that we do here at home on the farm is everybody gets planted with a native tree. So at the moment, because we’ve got areas of covenanted bush, which means it’s protected even after we pass, nothing can ever be done, the trees can’t be cut down, the land can’t be built on. So most of our dogs are all in covenanted bush, a few of my cats and my little heart dog that I lost on February 7, 2022, they’re buried in our orchard. But we are looking to try and make that area covenanted as well, so that again, it will always be protected. But we plan to try and we plan to put little plaques around as well and build little seats so that we can just kind of go and sit out there in nature with them and have a drink, have a talk. So yeah, I’ve got the big difficult thing for me is losing my heart dog Shelby last year. So she was number seven that we lost. She actually died on my husband’s birthday. So yeah. So that is going to be a tricky one when we get to it in a month’s time. Well, less than a month’s time, three weeks, so I’m not … not quite sure how that’s gonna go for me.

Angela Schneider 

The garden idea is absolutely lovely.

Kirsten 

Yeah, yeah, we think it’s really important to kind of give them back to the earth and plant a native tree that’s going to be around for you know, hundreds of years. So yeah.

Angela Schneider 

They will live on forever. I love it. 

Kirsten 

Yeah, that’s what we do down here in New Zealand.

Angela Schneider 

Anyone else?

Darlene 

I’ll go ahead since it’s still raw for me. Kristin, I’m so sorry. Seven dogs and like, oh, my goodness. Yeah, I’m so sorry.

Kirsten

Yeah, rough.

Darlene

I lost my heart dog in August. So everything is still raw going on five months later. And there are so many things that I have incorporated and started doing over the months to memorialize her. And one of the big things is traveling, we used to like to take her on road trips, kind of in New England, she loved the car. And I’ve been painting rocks with her name on them and putting like a little, like different colors and things like that and placing the rocks in different places during our travels and just to kind of memorialize her and spread her joy all over the place. And so that’s something that has been helpful for me the past few months.

Angela

Oh my gosh, yes. I have wanted to do a geocache in Shep’s memory too. I just don’t know the perfect place to do it. And it’ll come to me when I, when they, when it’ll come to me at some point, and then I’ll know where it’s supposed to be.

Kylee 

Darlene, you should send us all Kota rocks so we can put them where we are.

Everyone

Yes!

Darlene 

Completely. I’m totally going to do that. Send me your address and anyone who’s listening share your address and I will send you a Kota rock.

Nancy 

That is great. Yes.

Darlene

I love that idea. That’s awesome.

Angela Schneider 

Anyone else?

Nancy 

I just created a shadow box for … for Midnight with you know, some of the trinkets that I had from him and then the vet gave me his paw print and so few things like that and his collar. Then with my other dogs, I’ve I’ve gone on treks, places where Midnight and I used to go so you know it’s kind of an honoring him too but so that’s about it.

Angela

I think it’s important to remember that nothing we do to memorialize our pets is just anything. It’s an important act to bring us comfort and keep them close. And when it comes to working with our pet photography clients, who are facing the end of their pets’ lives and sometimes we meet them again, after the day has come, is there anything special you do for your clients that helps them hold on to the memories?

Jessica 

I think just holding space for them during their ordering appointment, especially if it’s a recent loss. I had a client the other day who just lost her cat. And she was actually holding it together very well, given that her cat had just passed a week prior. So it was very, very fresh for her. And I’m watching her move through this and I’m seeing her reactions. And she says, can I look one more time, just to make sure I’m picking all the ones that I love. And, of course, we go through them again and she starts tearing up. And she takes off her glasses. And it’s just her needing to sit in that emotion for a little bit and feel all the feelings and not feel judged for sitting there crying in the middle of our ordering appointment. I think just listening to her tell these stories and watching how much she loved this cat come out. It means a lot to our clients.

Nancy 

And just giving them the option of … of waiting for to review their photographs too because I had one client whose pet died within a week after our session. So she wanted to hold off on … on seeing the photo … photos because she just wasn’t ready. So we held off until she was ready.

Angela

One of my teachers as you hear me, talk about him often, David Kessler, he says, our responsibility is to meet our clients where they are. And so Nancy, you’re absolutely right, in that we don’t necessarily work on our timeline when it comes to our clients who are experiencing such profound grief. And it’s, it’s so important for us to have the … to give them the space that Jessica mentioned, not just during our meetings with them, but in the in-between as well. 

Kirsten 

I’m just gonna say that’s really good advice, Nancy. I’ve got an end of life session tonight. And usually I would do my image reveal appointment a week later. But I’ve already had the cogs turning that she might need more time on that because I know it’s different for everyone to get in and see them straightaway. And others need that bit of space to look at them. So after the end of the session tonight, I’m just going to be mindful around not being too pushy with that. 

Kylee 

Yeah. And I always try to just take my cue from the client, because for some people, you know, they need to take that break and not see the images. And for some people, being able to see those images and go through them really helps in their grief process. My parents actually lost their dog almost a year ago now. And one of the things that I did for them was I pulled all of the images that I had taken of him over the years. And I put them into a gallery. And I sent them a link and I said look at these when you’re ready, you know, I want you to pick your favorite. And then I printed them each an acrylic block of the image that they favorited you know, and my sister looked at them right away. And she’s like, this is the one I want. And my stepdad, you know, was really, this was his soul dog. And so he was really grieving. And so I said, it’s fine, you know, take your time, and just look at them when you’re ready.

Nicole 

That’s pretty much … I just send out their link to schedule their zoom call and I make sure they know no rush, just whenever they’re ready to see the images just let me know and schedule.

Jessica 

And the same can be said about that product delivery. You know, they’ve gone through that. They’ve had a little bit of time between when we’ve met for that ordering appointment and when I deliver. And it can be very bittersweet for some of them. To get those images can really bring up some raw emotions still that maybe they thought they had moved through. So giving them that space as well to determine when they’re ready to actually have those products and that artwork in their home too.

Angela

Great point. Ultimately, our job is all about creating memories for our clients to hold on to, in their grief and in their healing. Why is it important to everyone to make sure they have these beautiful, professionally created photographs and artwork?

Nicole 

I can only … based off of how I feel about my dog’s images, and I know how important they are to me, and I love looking at my old images and old videos that I’ve created of my dogs. And so I just assume that my clients feel the same way. And at first, it’s hard to look at them. But I hope that in time, they’re … the images, make them smile, and make them bring back their memories and make them happy.

Nancy 

And then mine is because of the loss of Midnight, and I had tons of pictures of him, but not any of the two of us together. So that’s why my goal is really to get … capture the client and their dog together so that they have those memories of them actually doing things that they love to do. Angela

Jessica 

We’re all so passionate about this. As with Nancy said, that’s a lot of the times why people come to me for these types of sessions, they have the cellphone photos, they have the selfies, but they don’t have any professional photos of them with their pets. And they may not think that they want those images. But those are always the ones that they end up choosing and hearing from my clients. Why it’s so important just reinforces to me why it’s so important.

Sharon 

I wish I had professional photos of Oscar and Katie, of you know, the whole family, and Oscar and Katie and, and we don’t. We have a lot of cell phones. And it doesn’t compare putting up a cell phone on the wall, to a photo that we take. And you know, we have a really cute photo near their ashes. But I, I personally wish, if I could go back have taken professional photos of Oscar and Katie.

Jessica 

And I think there’s something beautiful about seeing your relationship through the eyes of someone else, through that photographer, and being able to have someone capture those really intimate moments that you wouldn’t otherwise have.

Angela

Absolutely, I often say that I wish I knew someone like me when Shep was alive.

Darlene 

I wish I had a family picture of my husband and myself and Kota, a big huge framed portrait for the wall. And I have pictures of me and Kota, my husband and Kota. I could set up the camera, give it to him. I have all those printed out. But I do wish I had that huge family portrait right on the wall of the three of us.

Jessica 

Yeah, I’m gonna guess that’s probably what you want every single one of your clients to have as well.

Darlene 

It’s so true. Now that and then having — anyone who knows me and knows my story — my dog Kota was very reactive. So finding a photographer that could work with us location wise, doing what I do was the challenge in my area to find somebody that I could trust with her, trust in doing that. So unfortunately, Ididn’t have it done. But I do have a lot of pictures.

Lynn 

Yeah, no, I am so glad we were able to do our family photos this fall especially, you know, with Lance’s health scare.You know, and I know for me, you know, it’s important for me to capture photos, you know, with the pet and their people. Just because you know, we have, you know, photos of family members who passed away, you know, years and years ago. And it’s like, I don’t think it should be any different for our dogs. Because, you know, I mean, you know, Lance is he’s my soul dog and Lily, I mean, I absolutely love her to death. And of course, you know, I want those photos of them. But yeah, and just, you know, being able to provide photos for the client, I just, I surprised a client and I sent her an acrylic block. And she was so ecstatic. And she sent me this photo of, it’s basically now she has a shrine to her dog, it has, you know, she, when she was in Africa, you know, she had artwork done, of her dog’s name, and then you know, his collar, my photo, and there are a couple other things. So, you know, she was so happy that she was able to provide, that she was able to add this photo of Thor. To that, and to that, you know, for, for him. Yeah, so I’m, I’m just, I’m just grateful I can be there for my clients in their time of need, and provide them with something that they’ll be able to cherish for years to come.

Kirsten 

I think, for me, a lot of what everyone is saying is kind of resonating, I have a line that I use with my clients, I always plug that it’s really important to allow me to capture photos of them with the dogs or cats. Because a lot of the time I get on, I don’t want to go, and I don’t look good on camera, I don’t want it and I just say let me take the photo, if you don’t like it, you don’t have to choose it. But I find 95% of the time, they will always choose those photos of them together. But I find it as kind of a lot of a big barrier for some clients wanting to kind of have the photo with the dog because they’re so self-conscious. So I always try and talk them off that ledge let me take the photo.

And also earlier when people kind of talking about that space as well, I had a client once and I didn’t connect the dots at the time. And so it was a good learning experience for me. But she had come for an end of life session, the dog was 15, it was still quite peppy. We thought I think you know she probably had six or 12 months left. But within about two or three weeks, she had to put them to sleep. I had all the wall art and I had to keep chasing her because she wouldn’t come and pick it up. And probably about three months after I had it, I managed to get it to her and it wasn’t till then that I actually realized that the reason that she’d been delaying it was because she wasn’t ready to actually see the images and put them up on a wall yet and that had been a big, you know, mental and emotional barrier for her. And so that was I felt terrible at the time, but it was good learning curve for me that you know, if someone isn’t rushing to pick up their artwork after an end of life, then there might be another reason for that.

Darlene 

Something else you can do with the portraits that’s been one of the most meaningful things to me in the world right now is having a memorial tattoo done. And anyone if you haven’t seen my tattoo, and if I know you’re listening, you’re not gonna see my tattoo, but I got to show it to everyone here. I searched out one of the best portrait tattoo artists in my area and grabbed one of my favorite pictures of my dog Kota and both my husband and I had tattoos done. Six hours, it hurt. It was painful, well worth the pain. But I love being able to it’s on my forearm for those of you cannot see, but I love being able to look at her all day throughout the day and I find myself just looking and smiling. And that is the best memorial thing that I did in memory of her.

Angela

I have had a few clients take my images and turn them into tattoos. And I cannot think of a better honor for me to be a part of them for the rest of their lives too. It’s … it’s very humbling when my clients choose to take their Images and do that. Because I created something that was so meaningful to them that they now want it on their body.

Darlene 

That’s forever as we know.

Sharon

It’s a great feeling.

Angela

So now that you are all educated on pet loss grief and how to support your clients has it changed your approach to how you create memories for your clients in any way?

Jessica 

I lean more toward a storytelling aspect rather than just capture the shot. Particularly too because my clients are leaning more toward albums and folio boxes, they’re not always ready to have the big portrait on the wall. So I can now create something that tells their story and their connection and it, it makes sense for the products

Nicole 

Most of my clients who have … are doing end of life sessions want albums. So I definitely try to get enough variety and a little bit of story. And also the macro closeup for stuff like that just so that they have all those, all the little special things. So I do ask in my questionnaire on Rainbow sessions, if they have any special markings that, you know, are meaningful to them. Because they go well in the album’s to have some close up stuff.

Lynn 

Yeah, I know, for me, definitely, taking a lot more photos of the dogs with their people is definitely becoming more important to me as I do these sessions. And, you know, like one of my last sessions, I’m like, okay, you know, what is it something, where there’s something special you to do, and, you know, I was, you know, head on head photos of each other. And those were a couple of her favorite photos from the session. So and then, you know, even for people who don’t really want to be in the, quote, photos, you know, then I’ll do a lot of being in the photos without being in the photos. So there’s, you can still show that connection between the pet and their people without, you know, for the people who are a little bit more self-conscious about being in the photos, they can still be in the photos. And that’s something I’m probably gearing more towards is showing more pets and their people and you know, while still be doing photos of just the pet, but definitely taking a step of getting the people in more as well.

Nancy 

I’ll add that even I had a session this last weekend that it was not an end of life session. But I was asking them, you know what details they found important on their dog too. So even including them in what’s not meant to be end of life session. Because you never know.

Nicole

That’s so true.

Angela

Excellent point, Nancy. I was just speaking with someone yesterday, whose dog very suddenly died at four years old. She never got the opportunity to have a photo shoot because who’s thinking about their dog leaving at four? You aren’t. So I think it’s certainly something to think about on an ongoing basis. I look at my dog Bella, as my child. When somebody says do you have children? I say yes, I have a daughter and it is spelled D-O-G-H-T-E-R and her name is Bella. And of course I have tons of photos of her. She’s my practice model. She’s my location scout. She’s my co-pilot, my navigator all the things and so whenever I go somewhere my camera is on her. But I know that there are a lot of people who don’t think like that. And the random photos in the backyard with the cell phone is all … all they may be left with and for whoever is listening, we really always want to drive home the point to not wait to go get professional photography done when your pet, be it at a dog, a cat, a horse, an iguana, goat, whatever. Get it done, because the time may come and go and you’re left with your backyard cellphones.

Sharon 

I did a horse photo shoot, and it was not a legacy session. It was for this 15-year-old who loves her two horses. And a week after but during the photoshoot, I did take a lot of details of the horse and captured all that. And a week after her mom called me sobbing, saying that one of the horses had passed. So I’m glad it did take … zoom in more in the fur and the tail and the ears and all these little details for her. And she was very grateful because she wasn’t expecting her horse to pass away … which was devastating for … she’s still coping with the grief. She’s 15, It was her first love.

Angela

With your own pets, what is the most important detail a professional photographer would create? For me, I think it would be her feet. I like to lay on the floor and put her paws on my nose and just smell the Fritos. Is that weird? I love the smell of her feet. 

Sharon 

For me, it’s capturing Tito’s bum, because I think he has the cutest bum in the whole world I just want to bite it!

Nicole 

For my 13 year old border collie, it’s just your fuzz the back of his ears. Most people pull it, they pluck it on border collies. I like it. And I think it’s freaking cute.

Jessica 

For Hunter it would be his snow nose.

Darlene

I was just gonna say that!

Jessica

Kota had the twin nose to Hunter. So it’s his snow nose and he’s got … I’m not kidding you a heart on the top of his head. And I kiss it all the time. And when I kiss it I feel his super soft ears that just have stayed the same softness since he was a puppy and it’s the one thing I love about him so much.

Darlene

Love it. I love it. Yep, totally relate to Jess with the snow nose on Kota. Snow nose if you’re not familiar with it … that pigmentation, huskies. northern breeds especially and the winter it would get more pink and as Kota aged, it got really pink and then it had a nice kind of print across her nose with a mix of the pink and the blacks. Oh, definitely the details in that.

Jessica 

I actually had Hunter’s paw prints and his nose print done by a fellow pet photographer on an acrylic block. We did an ink print, it was a little bit of work, but I love it and it’s so neat. It sits on our shelf and I know I’m gonna love it when I don’t have him anymore because those were such a part of him.

Sharon 

That’s awesome.

Angela

Have you have you found a spot on Halo?

Darlene

A spot on Halo? She’s in shed right now. I spend my days plucking fur. The interesting thing about Halo is I was looking at one of the pictures I took of her in the snow. And I thought oh my goodness, her nose has the pink in it and it’s not as much as Kota’s had but I can see it still kind of that same mixture of color that I just love.

Kylee 

It think for omega it would be his tail. We call it his butt flag. So when he’s alert which, as a reactive dog, he’s alert like 99.9% of the time, but his tail goes like straight up in the air. And he’s got that like big shaggy like Shepherd tail and so it’s like all the individual first seem to like stick straight out and it just goes straight up and it’s like the craziest thing I’ve ever seen.

Lynn 

I think for Lily, it’s her bushy tushy. And Lance has decided to talk now. Lily has got the cutest bushiest tushy, you know, and it’s adorable. And then she also has a curly tail and the softest ears so you know and that she has these little white tipped paws which are absolutely adorable. And Lance I would say it’s his paws and his little helmet face his you know, he’s got looks like he’s wearing, you know, a little helmet. So I call him Helmet a lot and his paws because he’s always just putting his paw on you and it’s just the sweetest thing. 

Nancy 

For Declan, I think it would be his ears because he has, he looks like a lab, but his ears are long, like like a hound. And because he’s the mix there. So that’s one of the things and then he has a white strip on his chest that I love too.

Nicole 

Or Elf it would be her eyes because they’re like, giant. They look like they’re gonna pop out of her head. She won a contest once the buggiest, the buggiest I contest it was a photo where I was you know, moving a toy around and so her eyes were really big.

 Angela

She does have buggy eyes.

Nicole 

A little pointy face. And then her eyes are like, whoa.

Sharon 

And for Cisco, it would be like, the ears and the eyes. Cuz when I’m scouting a location or something, I use him mostly more than Tito. And he’ll sit there and he’ll pose for me. I’ll tell him to pose and he’ll go. But the expression on the ears will start moving and the eyes. And I just love that. Yeah.

Angela

Beautiful. So final question. Knowing what you guys know now, in what ways can people beyond photoshoots create memories to comfort and heal them in the days after.

Jessica 

Something a lot of my clients tell me they do is either a piece of jewelry, or they have a spot in their home that is kind of a tribute to their pets. So it’s got photos, and favorite toys and treat jars and collars, things that were really special to them. And it’s in a spot where they see it every day. And then they walked by and they can remember.

Kirsten 

Yeah, I just got … I agree with that I’ve got a few clients and they seem to do the similar sort of thing on like a little old table where they’ll have some of the photos displayed and flowers and a candle. And then they’ll have things like their collar and their lead and those sorts of things. Or if they’ve had them cremated, they might have their ashes here. So that’s what I kind of tend to find my clients do is just have a little area in their home where it’s almost like a shrine.

Angela

I’ve also had clients come back to me for additional photo shoots with their other dogs. And I welcome them to bring their urns, so that they can be together in the photos. This was particularly resonant for one recent client who had two very reactive pitties, and they could not be together anywhere at all, ever. They would fight with each other. And so even in the house, they had to keep them separate. And there was a lot of work for this young couple.

And so I told her I said bring Mr. Wiggles — hi Carol, I know you’re listening — I said bring Mr. Wiggles and we are going to get a picture of Mr. Wiggles and Betty together and we did and it was so meaningful for her to have them together in one photo.

Kylee 

So for those people that maybe didn’t have the opportunity to have photos taken, there’s other ways to do portraits as well. So we have luckily all of our pets are still alive. But we have watercolors of all of them. So I had found this incredible watercolor artist on Etsy. And I originally had a photo of Arawn painted for my husband for Christmas one year. And I loved it so much that I went back and had our other two dogs and our cat done as well. And we have those hanging in our living room.

Angela

That’s fantastic. And I do want to mention that Jess is our resident blogger about artful ways to memorialize your pet. She’s done interviews now. Jess, could you share some information about that?

Jessica 

Yeah, we had a great blog interview with Lindsay Farmery, who does all kinds of mixed media, artwork, from murals to people, but I think her specialty is pets. And she shared how her cat actually inspired her to get started connecting other people with their own artwork of their pets. And she does some great work. It’s colorful, and it’s fun. And it is a nice way to honor your pets that have passed in a bit of a happy way with all the bright colors, but also create something really cool of your pets that you have now so that when they do pass you have something unique to remember them by.

Angela

Again, another that’s such a good point to do it while they’re still alive. And Greyboy Prints as well. Right?

Jessica 

I forgot about Greyboy Prints. I was thinking art art. But she does these custom etchings. They are so cool. It is a photo that you have, it can be a cell phone photo doesn’t have to be anything professional. It can even have all kinds of junk in the background. And she’ll take just that pet and create the most beautiful, I almost want to say like antique looking print. And she uses her grandmother’s machinery I can’t remember the right word. So she’s got this kind of generational aspect to creating that art too. So she’s carrying on that legacy of her own family while helping you carry on your pets legacy.

Angela

That’s awesome. I hope you find more people to do stories on because I just love them.

Nancy 

I also do mixed media art too, as well. I started that when when some of my clients started asking me to somehow create … create something for them for their dog who had passed so I do some of that as well.

Lynn 

What I did for my husband one year is … Lance’s adoption coordinator. She does wood burning prints. And so I sent photos of the dogs to them and she did wood burning prints of the dogs for my husband, and then there’s another local woman who does chalk paintings, and quite a few pet portraits with chalk. Chalkoholic, which is her name and then Mossy Fox is for the wood burnings. Yeah, so I’ll probably do all of it at some point.

Kirsten 

It’s quite easy yourself as well in Photoshop to and there’s lots of tutorials out there as well to like use a photo that you’ve taken or even in the instances where clients haven’t had photoshoots and they might have poor quality cellphone images as you can actually turn them into watercolors yourself or pop art and there’s lots of apps out there as well now that you can use for that sort of thing too. I’m pedantic and too much of a control freak so I like to do everything the hard way and from scratch through Photoshop but you can buy plugins that will do it at the click of a button

Darlene 

Another idea … a friend of mine who is a jeweler and medalist and she has some paw print jewelry, if you have a clipping of your dog’s fur, she’ll put it in the back of like the necklace with some resin and you’ll have it there and your necklace which is a sweet idea to get some of the shed leftover. Pick it out of the carpet.

Kirsten 

I learned the other day but I think you must need a lot of fur that you can actually get the third turned into diamonds. The same way you can actually It’s … I don’t know how expensive it is, I was told it’s quite expensive and you need a reasonable amount of fur. But yeah, I learned that the other day. Something a bit different.

Sharon 

I kept Cisco’s and Tito’s teeth, when you’re changing the teeth. And I do want to put them in kind of like a pendant necklace.

Angela

Yeah, that’s awesome. Yeah.

Nicole 

I also recommend when they’re alive, a lot of video, a lot of video. I love looking at old videos of my dogs.

Angela

I love the sound of their voices. So I like to get video of the barking.

Darlene 

I wish I took more video, that’s for sure. 

Kirsten 

I’s so funny to me. 15 years ago, when we kind of had our pack of about, 11 dogs at the time. I had like the good old fashioned, you know, Sony Handycam, and I would be out there and we have so much video footage from when they were young. But now that we all have one of these that is with us all the time. I don’t take much footage at all. That’s really weird. So that Nicole it is a really important thing because and like you’ve said as well Angela like hearing the voices and having that to look back on.

Nicole 

I have made videos for all of my dogs while they’re alive. So … so with … with all of my video pieces that I have, I would create a video with music. And so each dog has one of those videos and I’m really like I don’t know … I love my videos. Now like as I’m losing those dogs, I love that I still have those videos.

Angela

OK, guys, we’re gonna wrap this up. Thank you so much for coming out today and … and chatting about memorializing your pets and we will have another roundtable on another topic very soon. You all have you all go and have a great night.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *