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Episode 17: The Art of Photographing Reactive Dogs

    Show Notes

    Our podcast is centred around connecting you, the human, to the support and services you may need as your pet ages and ultimately leaves your physical world.

    At the heart of those services is professional pet photography. All of the individuals who bring you this content are professional pet photographers.

    Some have niched down into what is known as end of life pet photography but none of us really like that term, since it’s so clinical and cold. We prefer Rainbow Sessions or Legacy Sessions or Memory Sessions.

    As a professional dog photographer, my niche is adventure, celebrating humans and dogs doing dog things in the great outdoors.

    Today, I’m chatting with Kylee Doyle of Kylee Doyle Photography in Sacramento, who has found her niche in reactive dogs. Kylee serves pet parents in Northern California, from Sacramento to Tahoe, helping them turn their pets into photographic artwork they can proudly display in their homes for generations to come.

    Reactive dogs often have an intense fear or aggression toward humans or other dogs, which can make it difficult for them to be in public spaces. That certainly presents its own set of challenges.

    Kylee has a reactive dog, Omega, a Dutch shepherd who has heightened sensitivities and can be an emotional handful.

    In trying to find resources to help Omega, Kylee realized other pet parents with reactive dogs may need someone to work with in a way that makes them feel safe and comfortable. Many may even shy away from having a portrait session done because they don’t know how their dog will handle it.

    But they have a beauty, personality and spirit that should be documented and celebrated, too, in photos that don’t scream “reactive dog!” or “aggressive dog!” 

    They are loving, individual beings who should be a part of your family photos and home décor.

    But enough of me going on about it. Let’s let Kylee tell us about photographing reactive dogs.

    What to listen for

    6:30 How reactive dogs can be challenging

    12:30 The ways Kylee mitigates reactivity in her canine clients

    21:00 The different parenting skills you need to develop for each dog in your house

    28:10 Why Kylee sees herself in her reactive dog’s eyes

    Find Kylee

    Kylee Doyle Photography

    Transcript

    Angela Schneider

    Welcome back to One Last Network.

    Our podcast is centred around connecting you, the human, to the support and services you may need as your pet ages and ultimately leaves your physical world.

    At the heart of those services is professional pet photography. All of the individuals who bring you this content are professional pet photographers.

    Some have niched down into what is known as end of life pet photography but none of us really like that term, since it’s so clinical and cold. We prefer Rainbow Sessions or Legacy Sessions or Memory Sessions.

    As a professional dog photographer, my niche is adventure, celebrating humans and dogs doing dog things in the great outdoors.

    Today, I’m chatting with Kylee Doyle of Kylee Doyle Photography in Sacramento, who has found her niche in reactive dogs.

    Reactive dogs often have an intense fear or aggression toward humans or other dogs, which can make it difficult for them to be in public spaces. That certainly presents its own set of challenges.

    Kylee has a reactive dog, Omega, a Dutch shepherd who has heightened sensitivities and can be an emotional handful.

    In trying to find resources to help Omega, Kylee realized other pet parents with reactive dogs may need someone to work with in a way that makes them feel safe and comfortable. Many may even shy away from having a portrait session done because they don’t know how their dog will handle it.

    But they have a beauty, personality and spirit that should be documented and celebrated, too, in photos that don’t scream “reactive dog!” or “aggressive dog!” 

    They are loving, individual beings who should be a part of your family photos and home décor.

    But enough of me going on about it. Let’s let Kylee tell us about photographing reactive dogs.

    Angela

    Good morning, Kylie, how are you today?

    Kylee  Doyle

    I’m good. How are you? 

    Angela  

    Good! Why don’t we get started with having you tell us a little about yourself and Kylee Doyle Photography in Sacramento, California.

    Kylee 

    Yeah. So I have been running this business for just about three years. Actually, it was three years, three days ago. So that’s exciting.

    Angela

    Congratulations.

    Kylee 

    Thanks. Yeah. And, you know, I started the business because I’d always loved photography as a hobby. And I actually did a workshop with a local photographer, for posing people. And I just wasn’t really feeling it. And we got to the end of the workshop, and they brought their dogs in, and I was like, holy cow, this is it, like, this is what I want to do. You know, and I’ve always loved animals. Growing up, I think everybody always thought that I would be a veterinarian, or, you know, do something with animals. And so it was just like that aha moment of, like, merging two things that I absolutely loved. And so, you know, I kind of started playing around with my own dog. At the time, I just had one dog, and then my parents had a dog. And so they became my models, and I just had fun kind of, you know, learning how to photograph pets. And then when we got a puppy, it really took me to that next step of like, OK, I want to be able to provide this service for other people. Because it’s so great that, you know, in a few years, we’d be able to look back and see those pictures, you know, of our honors a puppy, and compare them to where he was, you know, as he got older, and I really got into the business, actually, initially, I was volunteering for a couple of rescues, and photographing their adoptable dogs. And that kind of gave me you know, the jumping point to start connecting with other people in, you know, the pet industry and pet owners and people that really wanted the service.

    Angela

    What were you doing for a, quote, real job before you found dog photography? And how easy was it to walk away?

    Kylee

    Well, it hasn’t been easy, I’m actually still in my real job right now. So I work for a health care company, but I’m on the IT side. So that’s actually been really nice, because it’s given me a lot of flexibility. We’ve actually been working from home for probably about seven or eight years now. So well before COVID. So that’s been kind of nice, because I kind of set my schedule and, and I’m home, so on my breaks, I can work on the business and do some other things as I need to. But it’s definitely been really hard running both the business and working a full-time job. And definitely my goal is to eventually take the business full time and leave my current job. But it’s definitely been hard, because I work for a health care company. So I have great health coverage, I have excellent benefits. So it’s kind of scary, like thinking about, leaving all of that and being out on my own, and certainly my husband has a job,  and he gets benefits, but it’s just not really the same.

    Angela

    Yeah, that’s true. I understand that to dog photography has to feed a certain level of creativity in you, though. And I’m not saying that IT isn’t a creative industry. My mind was open to it being more creative than I originally thought when I met my own husband.

    Kylee 

    Yeah, I mean, you know, it is not terrible. I do a lot more like project management type stuff right now. Which to be honest, I don’t really love. But, uh, yeah, I mean, the photography, it’s just, I’ve always been really creative. I think my husband is always like, OK, what crazy thing are you up to now because if it’s not painting, I’m drawing or I’m doing origami, or I’m doing something. So I think having this outlet to really focus and, and to be able to get that creativity in has been really nice.

    Angela

    For sure. And so, how many dogs do you have right now?

    Kylee 

    So I have three dogs, so you can actually see Omega sitting in the dog chair. I have almost always had a chair in my office and the dogs always end up claiming it. It’s like their chair and they kind of switch off who sits there In it, but we do have … I have three dogs and a cat as well. So I have Anya is our oldest dog. She’s a German Shepherd-husky mix. She was kind of my first dog model. And she is my, she’ll be nine this year. And then we have Arawn, who’s the Belgian Malinois and he’s five, he’s the one that we got as a puppy. And then omega behind me, he’s four. He’s a Dutch shepherd. He’s my special dog.

    Angela

    Let’s talk about that. And how Omega has taken your dog photography business in a bit of a different direction.

    Kylee 

    Yeah, so like I said, Omega is kind of my special dog. He honestly has completely changed our lives. So I always it’s kind of a joke that we rescued him. He actually technically came from a backyard breeder. So kind of a little backstory on him. We got him when he was about five months old. And I had seen a post on Facebook for somebody who was looking to rehome him. And so we went out to look at him, and we got there. And it was like, holy shit. Like, this lady is like crazy hoarder. Like, we kind of think maybe she was doing drugs. And she was definitely breeding these dogs. And you know, we’re kind of like, OK, this is, this is not great. And when we went to look at him, she went to pick him up, and he peed all over her, he was just terrified. Me being the sucker that I am, I was like, I feel terrible for this dog. But my husband who’s not a sucker, I mean, even he was like, we can’t leave this dog here. Like, this is not OK. And so we ended up with him. And he is just so anxious, he’s afraid of everything. He’s actually on Prozac. Like, it is the … poor thing. Surprisingly, he’s not afraid of fireworks, the Fourth of July was totally fine for him. But everything else, you know, my husband slams the cupboard on the other side of the house, and he’s like, Oh, my God, what was that?

    Angela

    Oh, no.

    Kylee

    He sees like, a bird flying overhead, and he’s like, panics and barks at them. He kind of really directs our life, it’s like having a special needs child. We have to make sure that, like, he’s not being left alone for too long. He takes his meds and if we’re going to take him somewhere, we have to make sure that he’s not going somewhere that’s going to have too many triggers for him. We actually have a pet sitter come into our home, when we go on vacation, who specializes in reactive dogs, and she’s come over a whole bunch of times, and made sure that he’s comfortable. And it’s like having a special needs kid. We just have to plan everything around him. And I mean, I wouldn’t have it any other way. I mean, he 100% Is my soul dog. He, in addition to being really reactive, he’s very sensitive. And he knows, I mean, the second year mood changes, he’s right there. And, if you’re upset, if you’re angry, I mean, he’s right there, like trying to comfort you and trying to figure out like, what he can do to help you and he’s just such a special dog.

    But in having this reactive dog, like, it made me realize that there aren’t a lot of resources out there. For people with reactive dogs. There’s trainers that specialize in dogs like him, but that’s about it. We have not been able to find any groomers that will are willing to take on a dog like that. We’ve been lucky to find our pet sitter, but most pet sitters won’t deal with dogs like him, we actually ended up going the pet sitter route, because when I looked into like boarding facilities, because he’s on medication, and because he has a bite history, they don’t want to take the liability, and risks that something’s gonna happen.

    And then even for our industry, all of the pet photographers that are in our area, they want to photograph puppies, and they want to photograph happy go lucky dogs that can be out at a park anywhere, they don’t want to be dealing with the dogs that you need to find a special quiet place for them. And so that really kind of led me to start thinking about what resources can I provide my clients, and how can I help other people who have reactive dogs, not just with the photography, but  in directing them, OK, here’s, other resources that you can look at. Here’s ways that I can help you to kind of manage your reactive dog.

    Angela

    That’s pretty incredible. What are some of the signs that people need to watch for when you’re working with a reactive dog?

    Kylee 

    Some of the big things that I usually look out for, it’s really a lot of it is the body language. And I think a lot of people are not really aware, they see a dog, and they’re like, oh, my gosh, I love dogs, and they want to run up to the dog and pet it,  and my dog that’s a surefire way to create an instant panic attack. He doesn’t like people running toward him. He doesn’t like people sticking their hands in his faces. Obviously, the first thing is knowing your dog, but if you’re going up to a dog you don’t know, you want to watch their face and their ears and their body.

    He is kind of a hard one, because I feel like he’s taught us a lot about dog body language. Because he, I mean, he’ll definitely do the cowering if he’s really freaked out. But he’s pretty subtle with his facial features, it’s just a light switch of yours and a slight touch of the face. But a lot of dogs, it’s a little bit more obvious, and they kind of get the hunkered posture. The tail will tuck and the ears go back.

    People need to learn a little bit more about dog’s body language and, and just knowing that dogs are like people, and they have boundaries, too. And I think that’s the hard thing for people sometimes, because it’s a dog. And of course, everybody wants to pet a dog and all dogs love people. They just don’t and I mean, like I said, I have three dogs, and they’re all very different, and I have one dog that loves all dogs. She goes to the dog park, and she’s fine. And she wants to play with everybody. And I have one dog that is kind of dog selective, and we’re lucky that Arawn is very patient with other dogs. But he doesn’t really want to play with those dogs. He’s like, you can stay in your corner, and it’s fine. And then we have Omega who just can’t handle anything.

    Angela

    Dog parks are out for you, I would imagine.

    Kylee 

    Dog parks are out. Yes, I will take Anya to the dog park occasionally. Just because my dad loves to take his dogs. And so I’ll meet him. And she’s fine. But the other two, don’t go to dog park.

    Angela

    So how do you mitigate some of these reactions when you’re conducting a session?

    Kylee 

    Yeah, so I always before any session, I do, like a planning session with my client and with the dog. So I like to come out to their home, or depending on the dog, we can meet like at a park or somewhere that’s neutral, because for some dogs, the reactivity is people coming into their home.

    And so we always talk, I always have a quick phone call with them prior to anything happening, just to kind of get an idea of what they’re looking for in a session, and to get a little bit more information about their dogs. And then we will plan to have that consultation. And like I said, we’ll do it either in their home, or we’ll do it somewhere that’s kind of neutral, that way the dog can meet me, I’m not a complete stranger. Because for a lot of dogs that have reactivity, strangers or a big stranger danger, that’s a real big thing for them. And so I want to make sure that they’re comfortable with me. For some dogs that might be me coming over and meeting them a couple of times before the session to make sure that they really are comfortable. And for some dogs, it just the whole time and me staying out of their space. I have ways to mitigate that, I have different lenses that I can use, if the dog really doesn’t want me to be near them, I’ll use a longer lens, so that they can feel safe and comfortable. And I just try to get as much information from the pet parents, about the dog’s triggers, does the dog have a bite history. And certainly, my dog has a bite history, it doesn’t necessarily mean that they can’t have a session. It just means that I need that history. And I need to know what were the incidents and what caused it so I can avoid those.

    Angela

    One of these dogs is never going to be off leash. Keep your distance, that kind of thing, right?

    Kylee 

    Yep. Yeah. And when we plan the session, I always offer some different locations for them to choose from. I have a couple of locations that I use regularly, that are a little bit more private, have a little bit more space. There’s one place in particular that I use a lot that is like a 350-acre park. If there’s another dog in the area, we just go to a different spot in the park, and it works out totally great. And typically I’ll try to schedule those sessions during the week when I know that some of these locations will be a little bit less busy as well.

    Angela

    Are all of these experiences making you a better photographer?

    Kylee 

    Oh, absolutely. Yeah, for sure. It would be great to photograph dogs all day long, that can sit and stay and do everything that I tell them to do. Most of the dogs that I’m photographing aren’t that way, they’re reactive, and they see … my dog, he sees a bird and he starts barking, and most of these dogs aren’t going to sit and stay and look exactly where you want them to. But that’s part of the fun. I want these dogs to have a good experience, like, I don’t want the dog to go out and feel like we’re forcing it to do something it doesn’t want to do. I don’t want my pet parents to look back at these photographs and be like, Oh, my gosh, that was such a stressful day. So really, the photographs, that I’m doing for, especially for reactive dogs, they’re not typically going to be really posed, they’re going to be a capturing candids and photos of the pet parents with their dogs doing the things that they love doing with them. So for me, it’s not really important that they can, like, look at the camera, or they can do a high five or fancy trick or sit and stay. I want to capture the dog’s personality. And for most of these reactive dogs, their personality doesn’t include sitting and …

    Angela

    The levels of compassion and patience that you’ve built by knowing Omega and learning about reactive dogs … how can you bring that into sessions where you’re dealing with dogs that are in their senior years, or have a diagnosis?

    Kylee 

    Oh, my gosh, those sessions are always really tough. But honestly, like, I think working with these types of dogs, bringing that to end of life sessions. I mean, it’s definitely, it’s definitely made me a lot more patient a lot more compassionate. For sure, because these dogs that are reactive, they require that you can’t come into it thinking you’re gonna just have a quick session and it’s all going to be fun and games. Sometimes we kind of have to slow it down and, and take a step back and just let the dog decompress. Sometimes we need that in the end of life session, too. The dog’s not feeling well, if the dog can’t get around very well. Sometimes we just need to take a little extra time and let the dog do what they need to do.

    Angela

    When it comes to how important it is that you provide beautiful imagery of dogs to pet guardians, how do you express to people with reactive dogs that their dog is okay, and they will be able to have a successful session?

    Kylee 

    Just like a dog was not reactive, I mean, these dogs are, are part of our families. And I think that it’s so important that we capture that and we help them to create and capture these memories of these dogs. Because they are important. I always tell people before the session if, if it’s just too much for the dog, we can call it, I’m more than happy, it’s just really not happening for some dogs. It just really can’t, they just have too much. And so I always tell them if I need to refund the session fee, like it’s, we will do that. But I’ve never had to yet. For some dogs, it’s really just about figuring out where they’re comfortable. Some dogs that are reactive, we’re not going to take them out to a park, we’re going to do the session in the home, because that’s where they’re comfortable. And for some people like those images are even more special because that’s where they see the dog all the time.They’re not taking them out to the park and to breweries and to other places. They’re spending their time with those dogs in their home. And so that’s even more special for them.

    Angela

    All of the skills you’ve developed just by working with your reactive dogs, they translate into every session, yeah?

    Kylee 

    Oh, yeah, absolutely. Before this, I didn’t have any experience in dog training. I mean, I’ve  been to basic obedience training with my dog. But that’s, pretty basic skills. But definitely, working with, with Omega, we had during COVID, we had a trainer that specializes in reactive dogs with aggressive tendencies come out, and she spent a lot of time and I was at every session with him, and I learned how to not only train him, but how to help him to manage day to day. And that definitely translates to the sessions, because now I can help pet parent not just with reactive dogs, but with what we consider normal dogs, help them through the session and help them to direct them to what I need the dog to do. And hopefully, they can take some of those skills home as well, because not everybody comes with a perfectly well trained dog, you know, even if the dogs not reactive, the dog might not even know, you know, basic commands. So it’s nice to be able to kind of have that in my back pocket, that, yeah, I’m not a dog trainer, but I do know how to train. And I know how to look for signs that a dog is stressed and signs that a dog is anxious. And because even in just a regular session, you know, we may get to a point where the dog’s just stressed out, and we need to give them a break or call the session. So it’s not really unique to just reactive dogs.

    Angela

    I was listening to a friend’s business podcast yesterday, and his guest was talking about how he has different parenting skills for each of his six children. And first of all, I was like, six children.

    Kylee 

    Too many kids.

    Angela

    Yikes!

    Kylee

    Haha.

    Angela

    How are your communication skills different for each of your children, Anya, Omega and Arawn.

    Kylee 

    Oh my gosh, it’s so funny that you mentioned that, because that has been like a thing in our household because my husband is — bless his heart — like he just, he doesn’t really get sometimes that like, they’re very different. And they have to be treated differently. And he, they had dogs growing up, but it was just every dog should be trained and managed the same way. And so with our dogs, it was, that was kind of a thing early on that it was like, OK, they’re all very different. And they all have to be treated differently, and they have to be trained differently. And we started off with Anya, and we got her as a rescue. And she was about to, and she’s, I mean, she’s, for the most part fine. She’s a little bit skittish around men sometimes. And that was like, a big thing initially.

    Angela

    All of us girls are, aren’t we?

    Kylee

    Yeah, haha. Yeah, and so I felt like I kind of had to train him that it was like you, you have to be a little bit quieter around her, because she just doesn’t, she freaks out a little bit. And then with Arawn. And he is a Belgian Malinois and true to his breed, he needs a little bit of a heavier hand, sometimes, it’s like, he needs to be told, like, this is what you’re going to do, and you’re going to do it now. Otherwise, he, he gets a little like, oh, I’m gonna push the boundaries, and that was kind of more what my husband was used to. And so that worked out really fine for him. And then we got Omega, who is a Dutch shepherd. And he’s … his breed is very similar, but because he has all of his anxiety and his reactivity, you just, you have to be very quiet with him, you have to be very cognizant of what you’re doing and your movements, how loud you’re being. And that was like, just a complete shock to my husband. It was like, what do you mean, I can’t treat him the same way that I treat Arawn and I was like, it’s just he’s very different. You have to communicate with him differently. Like, he’s very sensitive, and if you’re loud or you’re upset, he catches on to that and he gets a little bit panicky. So it definitely … they all have very different, very different ways that we have to communicate with them and treat them and train them.

    Angela

    I’m very entertained by the way Omegas ears are bouncing while he …

    Kylee 

    Oh, my gosh, he’s hilarious. So he’s his ears never went up. And it cracks me up because my husband is always like, he looks so dumb. And I’m like, yeah, it kind of fits. Like he’s kind of derpy, and like, I think he would be a totally different dog if his ears were up. Like, his ears are floppy. And he’s kind of dumb and derpy and he cracks me up and he’s not doing now, sometimes he’ll sit there with his tongue out. And it’s like, this much tongue. It’s like, just the little end of his tongue sticks out. I know … I’m talking about you, huh?

    Angela

    Oh he knows. He stopped doing whatever it was, you were talking about. You’ve called are on your heart dog. And now Omega is your soul dog. What’s the difference?

    Kylee 

    We got Arawn as a puppy. I just immediately connected with him, and I think part of it was that we got him as a puppy, so we’ve been with him his whole life, basically and we were there to kind of help shape him and, and train him and teach him how to be a dog and how to be a dog in our family. And that’s been really special. And he is a really special dog. And I just, I feel this connection with him in my heart. And I know that when he’s gone, like, I’m gonna be devastated, more than I’ve ever been devastated over a dog.

    But when we got Omega, it was a different connection. Like, I when I look at him, and he’s, it’s funny, because I always joke that it’s like, he’s so dumb. And how could I love a dog that’s so broken this much. But it is, it’s like, I feel him in my soul. Like, he gets me and I get him. And I think that’s kind of the difference for me is that, like, I love Arawn to death and he is probably the best dog I’ve ever had. And I will just be completely crushed when he’s gone.

    Omega and I feel like two pieces of a puzzle.

    And, and it’s funny, because I kind of joke with, you know, my husband, we kind of teased them that it’s like, Omega is really my soulmate. That’s for me, that’s like the difference is that, although I feel a very special connection to our on the connection, I feel with Omega, it’s more and it’s more in my soul. Like, we just are two pieces that fit together perfectly.

    Angela

    Have you given any thought to the idea that you see yourself in his eyes? 

    Kylee 

    Oh, absolutely. Yeah.

    Angela

    What broke you then?

    Kylee 

    I don’t know. I mean, that’s a hard question. It’s tough, because I think about these things sometimes then it’s … you know, I had a great childhood. I’m not like, I wasn’t the victim of abuse or, you know,  anything like that. I mean, certainly, there was some difficulty when I was a teenager, my stepdad has not always been the greatest person. He went through a pretty difficult divorce before he married my mom. And I think he experienced a lot of anger following that. And so it was, sometimes it was tough, growing up emotionally, and having to see, like, the way that he treated my mom.

    I like Omega, I’m a pretty sensitive person. And I think sometimes living in the world and having that sensitivity is difficult, because I feel everything that everybody feels, and I am definitely very aware of other people’s emotions and other people’s moods, and that’s challenging, because you just feel like you have the weight of everybody on your shoulders, whether they want you to or not, it just happens.

    And it’s funny when my husband and I argue, my first reaction is to cry. And he hates it, he’s like, you always make me feel like I’m the bad guy. And I’m like, it’s not intentional. It just happens like the emotions that I feel are so strong, that it’s like I just my body, I have to have an outlet for it. And you know, and I I feel that that’s kind of how Omega is. He just, he feels everything so strongly that he just doesn’t know how to express it and what to do with all that.

    Angela

    We’re certainly living in a very overwhelming world. How do you and Arawn and Omega and Anya and your husband escape from it and find comfort in, maybe in the work you do? Or in just being?

    Kylee 

    Yeah, I mean, definitely, I think the pet photography has been a huge escape for me personally. I just love dogs, and I love being able to work with these animals and being able to capture these memories for people. But I mean, I think as you know, as a couple, as a family, we like to just kind of chill with the dogs, I mean, that’s like, our own favorite thing to do is like, snuggle in between us on the bed. And just like, be dead to the world. So, I mean, that’s been nice, and then the house that we’re trying to buy right now is on five acres and so we really want to kind of have that like homesteading life and kind of be able to not totally go off grid or anything, like, we’re not going like full crazy here, but wanting to be able to, like, separate from the world a little bit. And we plan on like, raising some of our own animals for food and growing our own vegetables, and just doing some things that kind of allow us to, like, feel a little bit separate from some of the craziness that’s going on.

    Angela

    Will you set up a half-acre or an acre as your own natural studio, because that’s my dream.

    Kylee 

    I know, oh, my gosh, I thought about it, I don’t know that the property that we’re getting is really like suited for it. It’s kind of like a longer piece. And so we’re probably going to have like a couple of cows in the front. But I mean, I probably will use it for my own dogs. But it’s nice because the area that we’re going to be in it kind of puts us like halfway between Sacramento and Lake Tahoe. So I kind of figure all start, you know, doing a little bit more sessions like out in Tahoe, because that’s really nice out there.

    Angela

    Oh, I’ve heard that. It’s kind of ugly in Tahoe. Am I wrong?

    Kylee 

    Depends on where you are in Tahoe. Yeah, right. Oh my gosh. Yeah. It’ll be really nice though. And just just even the area in between, you know, we’ve got all the rivers and there’s a bunch of other lakes and I’m just really excited for that.

    Angela

    That is so cool. Is there anything we haven’t covered that you’d like to mention, Kylee?

    Kylee 

    Gosh, I feel like we’ve probably hit it all. You know. I feel like we’ve covered the whole spectrum.

    Angela

    In just a half hour. I could get you talking for hours. That’s what I do. Thank you so much, Kylee.

    OK, so you know I was just kidding about Tahoe being kinda ugly, right?

    While I’ve never been there, it is on my destination list for road trips. I just wish my husband wouldn’t cringe every time I say, “Wanna go …” He’d fly and meet Bella and me there if it was up to him.

    Spoiler alert: It isn’t up to him.

    You know, reactive dogs deserve their moment. And they exist on a spectrum depending on what activates them.

    Kylee Doyle has an acute understanding of what that means and how to manage your dog and your expectations during a photo shoot. She puts your dog’s needs, comfort and happiness at the top of her priority list.

    She is also a pet loss grief specialist with One Last Network and prepared to support pet guardians on their last walks with their best fur friends.

    Next week, I turn the mic over to Kylee, who is interviewing her trainer Allison Daack of Daack Pack Dog Training in the Greater Sacramento area.

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